The Infinity Project Standardizes on LabVIEW | Automation.com

The Infinity Project Standardizes on LabVIEW

NEWS RELEASE – March 20, 2007 – National Instruments today announced the availability of NI LabVIEW for The Infinity Project, a version of the LabVIEW graphical programming environment designed for learning and exploring exciting engineering topics in high school and early college science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) classes. Founded at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, The Infinity Project provides engineering curricula designed for today’s high school and university classrooms, including a complete package of curriculum, industry-standard technology and professional development in more than 230 classrooms in 34 states.

NI LabVIEW for The Infinity Project is designed to work with the other components of the National Instruments Infinity Technology Kit, which includes the Texas Instruments DSP-based student board, the NI SPEEDY-33, a USB webcam and audio speakers. The software also comes with a novel course management interface making it easy for professors and teachers to access existing labs and create new labs.

“Project-based curriculum and hands-on technology like those The Infinity Project provides are integral to inspire and educate more scientists and engineers,” said Ray Almgren, NI vice president of product marketing and academic relations. “If we expect students to study science and engineering, educators must use relevant tools and teach topics – exactly what The Infinity Project delivers. NI has worked closely with The Infinity Project team to integrate LabVIEW into hands-on exercises so that the students can design and explore existing technologies like cell phones, digital cameras and MP3 players.”

The intuitive graphical programming language provides educators an engaging and fun way to teach engineering concepts through project-based learning. The National Instruments software platform incorporates more than 20 years of innovation and customer feedback to help educators introduce and teach real-world engineering concepts, including data acquisition, analysis, test and measurement, while helping prepare students for college readiness.

“In the United States, we face a critical shortage of well-trained engineers in the coming years. The Infinity Project aims to inform, attract and motivate more bright students to explore what engineering has to offer, and National Instruments is a key partner for our program,” said Dr. Geoffrey Orsak, dean of Engineering at Southern Methodist University and founder of The Infinity Project. “The LabVIEW graphical approach to programming makes it an ideal platform to teach problem solving and engineering concepts. NI LabVIEW for The Infinity Project software is a key to helping The Infinity Project achieve its goal of bringing the most innovative engineering education to every high school in the country.”

About National Instruments
National Instruments is transforming the way engineers and scientists design, prototype and deploy systems for measurement, automation and embedded applications. NI empowers customers with off-the-shelf software such as NI LabVIEW and modular cost-effective hardware, and sells to a broad base of more than 25,000 different companies worldwide, with no one customer representing more than 3 percent of revenue and no one industry representing more than 10 percent of revenue. Headquartered in Austin, Texas, NI has more than 4,000 employees and direct operations in nearly 40 countries. For the past eight years, FORTUNE magazine has named NI one of the 100 best companies to work for in America.

About The Infinity Project
The Infinity Project is a national leader in high-tech engineering curricula for today’s classroom. Created by Texas Instruments and the Southern Methodist University School of Engineering, this innovative program sparks students to pursue careers in engineering and technology. The Infinity Project offers a yearlong curriculum, outstanding textbook, leading-edge classroom technology and best-in-class professional development for teachers. It provides students with the chance to explore math, science, and engineering concepts in a fun, challenging, and hands-on way. Hundreds of high schools and colleges across the United States and abroad are utilizing The Infinity Project to build the technology leaders of the future.

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