Physik Instrumente releases U-521 linear stage piezomotor | Automation.com

Physik Instrumente releases U-521 linear stage piezomotor

Physik Instrumente releases U-521 linear stage piezomotor

May 12, 2016 - Ultrasonic piezomotors are small and provide motion with high resolution, as well as an extremely wide dynamic range from microns/second to 100’s of millimeters/second. A significant advantage over magnetic drive technologies is the self-locking principle: once the motor reaches a target position, it acts like a ceramic brake and locks the platform into place providing extreme long term stability at zero driving current and heat generation.

With the U-521, PI (Physik Instrumente), introduced a compact linear stage to its portfolio with dimensions of 35×35×15mm, similar to the size of a matchbox. The compact design is intended to enable easy integration, even when space is limited. In addition to the high speed up to 200 mm/sec, the low inertia (direct drive no rotating parts) allows for a dynamic start-stop behavior with settling times in the milliseconds. 

Precision – Closed-Loop: An integrated optical linear encoder provides position feedback with 100 nanometers resolution. Higher resolution versions are available for OEMs.

Applications: Typical application fields can be found in industry and research, for example, automatic micromanipulation, positioning of samples or when adjusting optical components, such as objectives and camera lenses. Vacuum-compatible versions (to 10-6 hPa) are also available.

Multi-Axis: Two stages can be combined to an XY-setup.

Rotation: The linear stage is complemented by a number of miniaturized closed-loop rotary stages with diameters from 20 to 50mm.

Drive Principle: A compact piezoceramic plate oscillates at 100’s of kHz (inaudible to human ears). Each cycle transfers a nanometric displacement onto a ceramic runner coupled to the moving carriage. No energy is consumed at rest, no heat to be dissipated, and the servo jitter is eliminated.

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